Case Interviews For Beginners: Complete Guide (2024)

Case interviews for beginners


This is a complete guide to case interviews for beginners. Whether you have no idea what a case interview is or have just started preparing for consulting interviews, we’ll walk you through the case interview fundamentals.

 

Case interviews can seem complicated, confusing, and difficult to learn. However, with the right knowledge and strategies, case interviews can be fairly straight forward and mastered by anyone.

 

In this complete guide to case interviews for beginners, we’ll cover:

 

  • Introduction to Case Interviews

 

  • Purpose of Case Interviews

 

  • Key Components of a Case Interview

 

  • Types of Case Interviews

 

  • Case Interview Preparation Strategies for Beginners

 

  • Case Interview Practice Cases for Beginners

 

  • Common Case Interview Beginner Mistakes to Avoid

 

  • Case Interview Beginner Tips for Success

 

  • Beginner Case Interview Resources for Further Learning

 

If you’re looking for a step-by-step shortcut to learn case interviews quickly, enroll in our case interview course. These insider strategies from a former Bain interviewer helped 30,000+ land consulting offers while saving hundreds of hours of prep time.

 

Introduction to Case Interviews

 



What is a case interview?

 

Case interviews are a special type of interview that every single consulting firm uses. They are almost exclusively used by consulting firms, although some companies with ex- consultants may also use them.

 

A case interview, also known as a “case” for short, is a 30 to 60-minute exercise in which you and the interviewer work together to develop a recommendation or answer to a business problem.

 

These business problems can be anything that real companies face:

 

  • How can Amazon increase its profitability?

 

  • What can Apple do to increase customer retention?

 

  • How should Tesla price its new electric vehicle?

 

  • Where should Disney open another Disneyland theme park?

 

Case interviews simulate what the consulting job will be like by placing you in a hypothetical business situation. Cases simulate real business problems that consulting firms solve for their clients. Many case interviews are based on actual projects that interviewers have worked on.

 

While consulting projects typically last between 3 to 9 months, case interviews condense solving the business problem into just 30 to 45 minutes.

 

Case interviews can cover any industry, including retail, consumer packaged goods, financial services, energy, education, healthcare, government, and technology.

 

They can also cover a wide range of business situations, including entering a new market, launching a new product, acquiring a company, improving profitability, and growing revenues.

 

Although case interviews cover a wide range of industries and business situations, no technical or specialized knowledge is needed.

 

Unless you are interviewing for a consulting firm that specializes in a particular industry or function, cases are designed to be solved by someone that has general business knowledge.

 

Nailing your case interviews is critical to breaking into consulting. There is no way to get a consulting job offer without passing your case interviews.

 

What are examples of a case interview?

 

Here is an example of what a perfectly solved case interview looks like:


 

Here is another example of what a case interview looks like. This case interview is one where the interviewer leads most of the interview.


 

Here is a third example of a case interview. In this case interview, the candidate leads most of the interview. We’ll cover the difference between interviewer-led and candidate-led case interviews later in the article.


 

Finally, here is a fourth example of what a case interview looks like. This case is primarily focused on market sizing. We’ll cover what market sizing is and how to solve it later in the article.


 

Purpose of Case Interviews

 

Why are case interviews used?

 

Case interviews are the best way for consulting firms to predict which candidates will make the best consultants. Case interviews do not predict this perfectly, but they come quite close.

 

Since case interviews simulate the consulting job by placing you in a hypothetical business situation, interviewers use case interviews to see how you would perform as a hypothetical consultant.

 

Many of the skills and qualities needed to successfully complete a case interview are the same skills and qualities needed to successfully finish a consulting case project.

 

Case interviews also give you a sense of whether you would like the consulting job. If you find case interviews interesting and exciting, you’ll likely enjoy consulting. If you find case interviews dull and boring, consulting may not be the best profession for you.

 

What do case interviews assess?

 

Case interviews assess five different qualities or characteristics: logical and structured thinking, analytical problem solving, business acumen, communication skills, and personality and cultural fit.

 

1. Logical and structured thinking: Consultants need to be organized and methodical in order to work efficiently.

 

  • Can you structure complex problems in a clear, simple way?

 

  • Can you take tremendous amounts of information and data and identify the most important points?

 

  • Can you use logic and reason to make appropriate conclusions?

 

2. Analytical problem solving: Consultants work with a tremendous amount of data and information in order to develop recommendations to complex problems.

 

  • Can you read and interpret data well?

 

  • Can you perform math computations smoothly and accurately?

 

  • Can you conduct the right analyses to draw the right conclusions?

 

3. Business acumen: A strong business instinct helps consultants make the right decisions and develop the right recommendations.

 

  • Do you have a basic understanding of fundamental business concepts?

 

  • Do your conclusions and recommendations make sense from a business perspective?

 

4. Communication skills: Consultants need strong communication skills to collaborate with teammates and clients effectively.

 

  • Can you communicate in a clear, concise way?

 

  • Are you articulate in what you are saying?

 

5. Personality and cultural fit: Consultants spend a lot of time working closely in small teams. Having a personality and attitude that fits with the team makes the whole team work better together.

 

  • Are you coachable and easy to work with?

 

  • Are you pleasant to be around?

 

All of these five qualities can be assessed in just a 30 to 60-minute case interview. This is what makes case interviews so effective in assessing consulting candidates.

 

What companies give case interviews?

 

Case interviews are primarily used by management consulting firms (e.g., McKinsey, BCG, and Bain), but they are also used by some technology companies (e.g., Meta, Google) and private equity firms (e.g., KKR, Blackstone) that have a lot of ex-consultants.

 

Management consulting firms that give case interviews

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technology companies that give case interviews

 

 

 

  • Microsoft (including LinkedIn)

 

 

 

 

Private equity firms that give case interviews

 

  • The Blackstone Group

 

  • KKR

 

  • TPG

 

  • Bain Capital

 

When are case interviews given?

 

Case interviews are given in nearly every single round of interviews. During first round consulting interviews expect 1-2 case interviews. During final round consulting interviews, expect another 2-4 case interviews.

 

The only round of interviews that will not have a case interview is the initial phone screen with a recruiter. They will ask primarily resume and behavioral interview questions.

 

First round interviews are heavily focused on case interviews. There will typically be few behavioral or fit interview questions asked. Each case interview is typically 30 to 40 minutes each. Behavioral or fit interview questions may take up less than 10 minutes.

 

Final round interviews have a bit more focus on behavioral and fit interview questions, but the vast majority of time is still spent on case interviews. Each case interview is typically 40 to 60 minutes each. Behavioral or fit interview questions may take up to 40 minutes.

 

As you can see, case interviews are the primary way that management consulting firms assess and select candidates.

 

Key Components of a Case Interview

 

There are seven key components or steps of a case interview: understanding the case background, asking clarifying questions, structuring a framework, kicking off the case, solving quantitative problems, answering qualitative questions, and delivering a recommendation.

 

1. Understanding the case background

 

The case interview will begin with the interviewer giving you the case background information. Let’s say that the interviewer reads you the following:

 

Interviewer: Our client, Coca-Cola, is a large manufacturer and retailer of non-alcoholic beverages, such as sodas, juices, sports drinks, and teas. They have annual revenues of roughly $30 billion and an operating margin of roughly 30%. Coca-Cola is looking to grow and is considering entering the beer market in the United States. Should they enter?

 

As the interviewer reads this, take notes. It is important to understand what the objective of the case is and keep track of information.

 

One strategy for taking notes effectively is to turn your paper landscape and draw a vertical line to divide your paper into two sections. The first section should be roughly two-thirds of the page while the second section will be one-third of the page.

 

Take notes in the second section of your page:


Case interview note taking

 

After the interviewer finishes giving the case background information, confirm that you understand the situation and objective. Provide a concise synthesis like the following:

 

You: To make sure I understand correctly, our client, Coca-Cola, is a large manufacturer and retailer of non-alcoholic beverages. They are looking to grow and our objective is to determine whether or not they should enter the U.S. beer market.

 

Interviewer: That sounds right.

 

Make sure your synthesis is concise. You do not want to regurgitate verbatim everything that the interviewer has said. Only mention the most important pieces of information.

 

You should also make sure you verify the objective of the case. Answering or solving the wrong case objective is the quickest way to fail a case interview.

 

2. Asking clarifying questions

 

Next in the case interview, you’ll have the opportunity to ask questions before you begin thinking about how to solve the case.

 

At this point, only ask questions that are critical for you to fully understand the case background and objective. You’ll be able to ask more questions later.

 

Types of questions you should ask:

 

  • Asking for a definition of a term you’re unfamiliar with

 

  • Asking for information that strengthens your understanding of the company or situation

 

  • Asking questions that clarify the objective of the case

 

  • Asking to repeat information you may have missed

 

You might ask a few questions like the following:

 

You: Is Coca-Cola looking to specifically grow revenues or profits?

 

Interviewer: Coca-Cola wants to grow profits.

 

You: Is there a particular financial goal or metric Coca-Cola is trying to reach within a certain time frame?

 

Interviewer: They are looking to grow annual profits by $2 billion within 5 years.

 

You: Great. Those are all the immediate questions I have for now.

 

3. Structuring a framework

 

After you understand the case background and objective of the case interview, lay out a framework of what areas you want to look into in order to answer or solve the case.

 

A case interview framework is simply a tool that helps you structure and break down complex problems into simpler, smaller components. Think of a framework as brainstorming different ideas and organizing them into different categories.


 

When creating a framework, it is completely acceptable to ask the interviewer for a few minutes of silence to write out a framework.

 

You: Would you mind if I take a few minutes to structure my thoughts and develop a framework to tackle this case?

 

Interviewer: Of course, go ahead.

 

For this case example, what do you need to know in order to help Coca-Cola decide whether or not they should enter the beer market?

 

You might brainstorm the following questions:

 

  • Does Coca-Cola know how to produce beer?

 

  • Would people buy beer made by Coca-Cola?

 

  • Where would Coca Cola sell its beer?

 

  • How much would it cost to enter the beer market?

 

  • Will Coca-Cola be profitable from doing this?

 

  • How can Coca-Cola outcompete competitors?

 

  • What is the market size of the beer market?

 

This is not a very structured way of tackling the case, so organize these ideas into a framework that has 3 – 4 broad areas, also called “buckets”, that you want to investigate.

 

An easy way to develop these buckets is to ask yourself, what 3 – 4 things must be true for you to 100% recommend that Coca-Cola should enter the beer market.

 

In an ideal world. These four things would need to be true:

 

  • The beer market is an attractive market with high profit margins

 

  • Competitors are weak and Coca-Cola will be able to capture significant market share

 

  • Coca-Cola has the capabilities to produce an outstanding beer product

 

  • Coca-Cola will be extremely profitable

 

You can rephrase these points to be the broad categories in your framework. You can write your framework in the first section of your paper:


Case interview market entry framework

 

Next, let’s add a few bullets under each category to give more detail on exactly what information we need to know to decide whether Coca-Cola should enter the beer market.


Case interview market entry full framework

 

This entire process of brainstorming ideas and developing a structured framework should only take a few minutes.

 

How do you come up with a framework so quickly?

 

Most candidates make the mistake of either using a single memorized framework for every case or memorizing multiple different frameworks for different cases.

 

The issue with memorized frameworks is that they aren’t tailored to the specific case you are solving for. When given an atypical business problem, your framework elements will not be entirely relevant.

 

Interviewers can easily tell that you are regurgitating memorized information and not thinking critically.

 

Instead of memorizing frameworks, I recommend memorizing a list of 8 - 10 broad business elements, such as the following:


Case interview framework buckets

 

When given a case, mentally run through this list and pick the 3-4 elements that are most relevant to the case. This will be your framework. If the list does not give you enough elements, brainstorm and add your own elements to your framework.

 

This strategy guarantees that your framework elements are relevant to the case. It also demonstrates that you can create unique, tailored frameworks for every business problem.

 

Using this strategy for this case, you would run through your list of memorized business elements and select the following:


Case interview framework example

 

This strategy is a shortcut for creating unique tailored frameworks for every business problem. You do not need to develop a framework entirely from scratch every time.

 

Now that you have your framework, turn your paper to face the interviewer and walk them through it.

 

You: To decide whether or not Coca-Cola should enter the market, I want to look into four main areas.

 

One, I want to look into the beer market attractiveness. Is this an attractive market to enter? I’d want to look into areas such as the market size, growth rate, and profit margins.

 

Two, I want to look into the beer competitive landscape. Is this market competitive, and will Coca-Cola be able to capture meaningful market share? I want to look into questions such as the number of competitors, how much market share each competitor has, and whether competitors have any competitive advantages.

 

Three, I want to look into Coca-Cola’s capabilities. Do they have the capabilities to succeed in the beer market? I want to look into things such as whether they have the expertise to produce beer, whether they have the distribution channels to sell beer, and whether there are any existing synergies they can leverage.

 

Four, I want to look into expected profitability. Will Coca-Cola be profitable from entering the beer market? I want to look into areas such as expected revenues, expected costs, and how long it would take to break even.

 

The interviewer might ask a few questions on your framework, but will otherwise indicate whether they agree or disagree with your approach.

 

For a complete guide on how to create tailored and unique frameworks for each case, check out our article on case interview frameworks.

 

4. Kicking off the case

 

If this is an interviewer-led case, the interviewer will propose which area of your framework they would like to dive deeper into. They might say something like the following:

 

Interviewer: Your framework makes sense to me. Why don’t we start by estimating the size of the U.S. beer market.

 

If this is a candidate-led case, you will be expected to propose an area to look into. There is no right or wrong area to start first. Propose any area of your framework as long as you have a reason for it.

 

You could say something like:

 

You: To start, I’d like to look into the beer market attractiveness. I’d like to first understand the market size to determine if the beer market is an attractive market.

 

If you end up picking an area that the interviewer does not want you to explore, they will redirect you to an area that they do want you to explore.

 

The two styles of case interviews are nearly identical. The only difference is whether or not you have to proactively propose what area to explore first and what area you want to explore next.

 

5. Solving quantitative problems

 

Expect to perform calculations and analyze charts and graphs during your case interview.

 

Market sizing questions are one type of quantitative question you may get asked.


 

Let’s say the interviewer asks you:

 

Interviewer: What is the market size of beer in the U.S.?

 

Most candidates jump right into the math, stating the U.S. population and then performing various calculations. Doing math without laying out a structure often leads to making unnecessary calculations or reaching a dead-end.

 

Laying out an upfront approach helps avoid these mistakes and demonstrates that you are a logical, structured thinker.

 

For this market sizing problem, you could structure your approach in the following way:

 

  • Start with the U.S. population

 

  • Estimate the percentage that are legally allowed to drink alcohol

 

  • Estimate the percentage that drink beer

 

  • Estimate the frequency in which people drink beer

 

  • Estimate the average price per can or bottle of beer

 

Multiplying these steps together gives you the answer. By laying out an approach up front, the interviewer can easily understand how you are thinking about the problem. With the right structure, the rest of the problem is simple arithmetic.

 

Sometimes the interviewer will give you numbers to use for these calculations. Other times, you’ll be expected to make assumptions or estimates.

 

When performing your calculations, make sure to do them on a separate sheet of paper. Calculations often get messy and you want to keep your original paper clean and organized.

 

A sample answer to this question could look like this:

 

You: To estimate the market size of beer in the U.S., I’m going to start with the U.S. population. Then, I’ll estimate the percentage that are eligible to drink alcohol. I’ll then estimate the percentage of the remaining population that drinks beer.

 

If we take this and multiply it by the frequency in which people drink beer and the average price per can or bottle of beer, we will find an estimate for the market size. 

 

Does this approach make sense to you?

 

Interviewer: Makes sense to me.

 

You: Great. I’ll assume the U.S. population is 320M people. Assuming the average life expectancy is 80 years old and an even distribution of ages, roughly 75% of the population can legally drink alcohol.

 

This gives us 240M people. Of these, let’s assume 75% of people drink beer. That gives us 180M beer drinkers.

 

Let’s say on average, a person drinks five beers a week, or roughly 250 beers per year, assuming roughly 50 weeks per year.

 

This gives us 180M * 250 = 45B cans or bottles of beer.

 

Assuming the average can or bottle of beer costs $2, this gives a market size of $90B.

 

You should not only answer the question, but tie the answer to the case objective.

 

In other words, how does knowing the U.S. market size of beer help you decide whether or not Coca-Cola should enter the market?

 

You could say something like the following:

 

You: Given that Coca-Cola has annual revenues of $30B, a $90B beer market represents a massive opportunity. The market size makes the beer market look attractive, but I’d like to understand if beer margins are typically high and determine how much market share Coca-Cola could realistically capture.

 

A second type of quantitative question you could be asked is to calculate profit or profitability. The interviewer may ask you:

 

Interviewer: Assume that a 12-ounce can of beer sells for $2 on average. To produce a keg of beer, it costs $100 for raw materials, $95 for labor, and $75 for storage. If a keg of beer holds 1,800 oz. of beer, what is the profit margin for beer?

 

Make sure you structure your approach and connect your answer to the case objective.

 

A sample answer could look like:

 

You: To calculate the profit margin for beer, I will first calculate the total costs to produce a keg of beer. Next, I will divide the volume of a keg by the volume of a can to determine how many cans a keg of beer produces.

 

Afterwards, I will divide the total cost of producing a keg of beer by the number of cans in a keg of beer to determine the cost per can.

 

Finally, I can use the price and cost per can of beer to calculate the margin of beer. Does this approach make sense to you?

 

Interviewer: Makes sense to me.

 

You: Great. The total cost of a keg of beer is $100 plus $95 plus $75, or $270. The number of cans of beer in a keg is 1,800 oz. divided by 12 oz., or 150 cans.

 

Therefore, the cost per can of beer is $270 divided by 150 cans, or $1.80. Since the average price of beer is $2 per can, the profit is $0.20 per can. This makes the margin $0.20 divided by $2 or 10%.

 

Compared to Coca-Cola’s overall operating margin of 30%, the beer market profit margin of 10% is significantly lower. Although the market size for beer is large, the low margin makes the beer market less attractive.

 

A third type of quantitative question you could get asked is interpreting charts and graphs. The interviewer may show you the following:


Case interview chart and graph example

 

A helpful strategy is to start your analysis by explaining what the axes of the chart show. This will help you understand the chart better.

 

Next, don’t just read what numbers the chart shows, but interpret what those numbers mean for the case objective.

 

A sample answer might look like the following:

 

You: For this chart, we have market share on the y-axis and different categories of beer on the x-axis. For each category, we see that market share is concentrated among a few large players. This implies a highly competitive market with high barriers to entry. Because of this, the beer market does not look attractive because it is so competitive.

 

6. Answering qualitative questions

 

In addition to asking quantitative questions during the case interview, the interviewer will also ask qualitative questions.

 

One type of qualitative question you could get asked are brainstorming questions. For example, the interviewer might ask:

 

Interviewer: What are the barriers to entry in the beer market?

 

Most candidates answer by listing ideas that immediately come to mind:

 

  • Brewing equipment

 

  • Beer production expertise

 

  • Distribution channels

 

  • Brand name

 

This is a highly unstructured way of answering the question. Make sure to use a simple structure to organize your thoughts.

 

A simple structure, such as thinking about barriers to entry as either economic barriers or non-economic barriers, helps facilitate brainstorming and demonstrates logic and structure.

 

With this structure, you might come up with the following answer:


Case interview qualitative structure example

 

Have a simple structure when answering qualitative questions. Examples of other simple structures to use include the following:


Case interview qualitative frameworks

 

Additionally, take your answer and connect it to the case objective. In this example, are these barriers to entry high or low? Do you think Coca-Cola can overcome these obstacles to enter the beer market?

 

You might answer this question in the following way:

 

You: I’m thinking of barriers to entry as economic barriers and non-economic barriers. Economic barriers include things such as equipment, raw material, and other capital. Non-economic barriers include: beer brewing expertise, brand name, and distribution channels.

 

Looking at these barriers, I think it will take Coca-Cola a lot of work to overcome these barriers. While Coca-Cola does have a brand name and distribution channels, they lack beer brewing expertise and would have to buy a lot of expensive equipment and machinery. These barriers make entering the beer market difficult.

 

Another type of question you could get asked are business opinion questions, such as the following:

 

Interviewer: Do you think there are significant production synergies in producing non-alcoholic beverages and producing beer?

 

As always, structure your answer and connect your answer to the case objective.

 

Here is a sample answer:

 

You: Production involves equipment, raw materials, and labor. There is likely some overlap in equipment, such as using the same bottling machines, but Coca-Cola will likely need new equipment for brewing beer.

 

Raw materials, on the other hand, are completely different. Coca-Cola will need to source barley, hops, and yeast, which it currently does not use in its existing beverages.

 

Finally, the same labor can be used, but employees will need new training since producing beer is fairly different from producing a non-alcoholic drink.

 

Overall, I think there are only a few production synergies that Coca-Cola can leverage, which makes entering the market a bit more difficult.

 

7. Delivering a recommendation

 

You’ve done a ton of work so far in the case interview and now it is time to put everything together into a recommendation.

 

Throughout the interview, you should have been making notes of key takeaways after each question you answer.

 

Take a look at the key takeaways you’ve accumulated so far and decide whether you want to recommend entering the beer market or not entering the beer market:

 

  • The U.S. beer market size is $90B compared to Coca-Cola’s annual revenue of $30B

 

  • The beer market profit margins are 10% compared to Coca-Cola’s average margin of 30%

 

  • The beer market is highly concentrated across all categories

 

  • Barriers to entry are moderate

 

  • There are some synergies with existing production

 

There is no right or wrong recommendation, as long as you support your recommendation with reasons and evidence.

 

Regardless of what stance you take, make sure you have a firm recommendation. You do not want to be flimsy and switch back and forth between recommending entering the market and not entering the market.

 

Secondly, make sure your recommendation is clear and concise. Use the following structure:

 

  • Clearly state what your recommendation is

 

  • Follow that with the 2 - 3 reasons that support your recommendation

 

  • State what potential next steps would be to further validate your recommendation

 

The conclusion of the case might look like the following:

 

Interviewer: Let’s say that you bump into the CEO of Coca-Cola in the elevator. He asks you what your preliminary recommendation is. What do you say?

 

You: I recommend that Coca-Cola should not enter the U.S. beer market for the following three reasons.

 

One, although the market size is fairly large at $90B, the margins for beer are just 10%, significantly less than Coca-Cola’s overall operating margin of 30%.

 

Two, the beer market is very competitive. In all beer segments, market share is concentrated among a few players, which implies high barriers to entry. Coca-Cola lacks beer brewing expertise to produce a great product that existing incumbents have.

 

Three, there are not that many production synergies that Coca-Cola can leverage with its existing products. Coca-Cola would need to buy new equipment, source new raw materials, and provide new training to employees, which will be time-consuming and costly.

 

For next steps, I want to look into Coca-Cola’s annual expected profits if they were to enter the U.S. beer market. I hypothesize that they will be unable to achieve an increase in annual profits of $2B within five years, but I’d like to confirm this through further analysis.

 

Types of Case Interviews

 

What are the different types of case interviews?

 

Case interviews cover a wide variety of functions and business situations. However, there are six common case interview business situations that account for the majority of all case interviews: profitability, market entry, growth, pricing, merger and acquisition, and new product.

 

There is a very high chance that you’ll see these types of case interviews in your first-round and final-round consulting interviews.

 

1. Profitability case interviews


 

Profitability cases ask you to identify why a company is experiencing a decline in profitability and what they should do to address it. This is the most common business situation for case interviews.

 

To solve these types of cases, you’ll need to understand quantitatively, what is the driver causing the decline in profits? You will need to determine whether revenues have gone down, costs have gone up, or both have occurred.

 

Afterwards, you’ll need to understand why this is happening. Once you understand this, you can brainstorm potential ideas and prioritize the solutions that are the most impactful and feasible to implement.

 

2. Market entry case interviews

 

Market entry cases ask you to determine whether a company should enter a new market. This is the second most common business situation for case interviews.

 

To make this decision, you’ll need to assess whether the market is attractive, how strong competitors are, whether your company has the capabilities to enter, and what the expected profitability is.

 

3. Growth case interviews

 

Growth cases ask you to determine how a company can best increase its revenues.

 

To solve this case, you’ll need to identify all of the major ways the company can grow.

 

Should the company grow organically by targeting new geographies or customer segments?

 

Should they grow by launching new products and services?

 

Instead, should the company grow inorganically by acquiring or forming a partnership with another company?

 

Once you have identified all of the major opportunities for growth, you can prioritize the opportunities that are the most impactful and feasible.

 

4. Pricing case interviews

 

Pricing cases ask you to determine how to set the optimal price on a product or service. To do this, you’ll need to consider different factors.

 

How much does the product cost to produce? You don’t want to price the product too low such that you have a loss on each sale.

 

How much are customers willing to pay for the product? You don’t want to price the product too high such that no customer is willing to purchase your product.

 

How much are competitors setting prices for similar products? You don’t want to price the product too high such that customers choose to purchase competitor products.

 

Considering each of these points will help you determine the right price to set.

 

5. Merger and acquisition case interviews

 

Merger and acquisition cases ask you to determine whether a particular company should be acquired.

 

To solve this case, you’ll first need to understand what the reason is for the acquisition. In most cases, the company will be looking to grow its revenues and profits.

 

Then, you’ll need to assess whether the market that the acquisition target plays in is attractive, whether the acquisition target itself is attractive, whether there will be any meaningful synergies, and whether the financials of the acquisition make sense.

 

These considerations will help you determine whether the acquisition should be made.

 

6. New product case interviews

 

New product cases ask you to determine whether a company should create and launch a particular new product.

 

To solve this case, you’ll need to assess whether the product’s market is attractive, whether the product meets customer needs, whether the product is superior to competitor products, whether the company has the capabilities to create and launch the product, and what the expected profitability is.

 

These considerations will help you make a smart and informed decision.

 

What are the different formats of case interviews?

 

There are three major formats of case interviews: traditional case interviews, written case interviews which assess presentation and communication skills more heavily and group case interviews which assess teamwork and collaboration more heavily.

 

1. Traditional Case Interview


The traditional case interview is the format that accounts for 80 to 90 percent of all case interviews. It is the format we have covered so far in which you and the interviewer work together to develop a recommendation or answer to a business problem.


The traditional case interview starts with the interviewer explaining the case background information to you. The case interview ends after you have delivered your recommendation to the interviewer.


There are two styles of traditional case interviews, candidate-led case interviews and interviewer-led case interviews.


  • Candidate-led case interviews: You will be driving the direction of the case. You will propose what area of your framework to start in, what questions you would want to answer, what analyses you would want to do, and what the next step is to solve the case. If you go down the wrong direction, the interviewer will steer you back on course, but you ultimately decide what to do next.

 

  • Interviewer-led case interviews: The interviewer will be steering and controlling the direction of the case. The interviewer will point you to which questions to answer, what analyses to do, and what the next step is to solve the case.

 

2. Written Case Interview


Written case interviews are much less common than traditional case interviews.

 

For written case interviews, you will be given a packet of information at the beginning of the interview. This packet usually has between 20 to 40 pages of graphs, charts, tables, and notes. You’ll be given information on the case background and the objective of the case.


In some written case interviews, you may also be given a list of important questions to answer. In other written case interviews, you’ll only be given the primary business problem you are asked to answer.


You’ll then have 1 to 2 hours to analyze the information packet and then make 3 to 5 slides to present your analysis and recommendation to the interviewer.


In some written case interviews, you’ll have to create these slides completely from scratch. In other written case interviews, you’ll have pre-filled slide templates that you will fill out with your analysis and work.


For written case interviews, you’ll be working by yourself. The interviewer will leave the room to let you work and then return when time is up to hear your presentation. During the presentation, the interviewer may ask follow-up questions on your work and findings.


3. Group Case Interview


Group case interviews are also much less common than traditional case interviews.

 

For group case interviews, you’ll be put into a group of 3 to 6 people with other candidates that are also interviewing for the same consulting job you are interviewing for. The group will be given materials which contain the case background, objective, and all of the information needed to solve the case.


You’ll then have 1 to 2 hours to work together as a group to create a slide presentation that summarizes your work and recommendation.


During this time, the interviewer will be listening in on the discussions and conversations that the group will have, but they will not interfere or answer any questions.


Once the time is up, your group will deliver your presentation to the interviewer, who may also ask follow-up questions on the work and findings.


For group case interviews, there is a heavy emphasis on assessing how well you work in a team. Consultants spend almost all of their time working closely in small teams, so teamwork and collaboration are essential.

 

Interviewers will assess you on criteria such as the following:


  • Can you make meaningful contributions while working in a group?

 

  • Are you easy to work with?

 

  • Can you handle conflict and disagreement with teammates?

 

  • Do you bring out the best ideas and qualities in other people?

 

Case Interview Preparation Strategies for Beginners

 

How long does it take to prepare for case interviews?

 

Candidates typically spend 60 to 80 hours preparing for case interviews, equivalent to 6 to 8 weeks of preparation. However, exceptional candidates with strong business and communication skills might need as little as 4 weeks. Those lacking a business background could require as long as 12 weeks.

 

We have seen exceptional candidates pass their consulting interviews and receive offers from McKinsey, BCG, or Bain in just one or two weeks. We have also heard of candidates spending more than 100 hours preparing for case interviews, but receiving no consulting offers.

 

There are four factors that impact how much time you’ll need to dedicate to preparing for case interviews. Assessing these factors will help you set expectations for the amount of time you should expect to spend.

 

1. Natural intuition and ability

 

Case interviews require a strong business intuition and excellent communication skills. Some people will have a higher baseline on these skills than others.

 

If you have studied business in school or have worked a job that does similar work to consulting, you’ll likely already have a good business intuition. If you give speeches, presentations, or participate in debates frequently, you’ll likely already have good communication skills.

 

Although these abilities can be learned by anyone, some people will naturally have strong abilities to start with. For these people, they will likely need to spend less time preparing for case interviews than the average person.

 

2. Learning speed

 

Some people are faster learners than others. There are many skills you’ll need to learn and develop to be proficient in case interviews, such as structuring a framework, developing a hypothesis, solving math problems, and delivering a recommendation.

 

These skills require no specialized knowledge or expertise. Anyone can learn and master these skills with enough practice. However, some people will pick up these skills faster than others.

 

3. Quality of practice

 

The quality of your practice determines how quickly you can learn and master case interviews.

 

If you practice with case interview partners that don’t know how to properly deliver a case interview and provide feedback, you’ll learn much more slowly than someone practicing with a consultant who has given interviews before.

 

Similarly, if the practice cases you use are not representative of an actual case interview or don’t have outstanding model answers, you’ll learn much more slowly than someone using high-quality practice cases.

 

4. Consulting firm requirements

 

The amount of time needed to prepare for case interviews also depends on the consulting firms that you are applying for.

 

The top three consulting firms, McKinsey, BCG, and Bain, have the highest standards and requirements when assessing a candidate’s case interview capabilities. Less prestigious consulting firms may have a lower bar that you need to pass.

 

If you are recruiting for McKinsey, BCG, and Bain, you’ll likely need to spend more time preparing for case interviews than someone recruiting for Deloitte or Accenture.

 

When should I begin preparing for case interviews?

 

Given that it takes candidates on average 60 to 80 hours to prepare for case interviews, you should begin preparing for case interviews at least 6 to 8 weeks in advance. To give yourself adequate time, you should ideally start preparing 16 to 24 weeks in advance.

 

Preparing 16 to 24 weeks in advance provides sufficient buffer time. You may find yourself too busy to prepare for case interviews during some weeks. You may also realize that you have significant skill or capability gaps as you start preparing, requiring more time to improve.

 

Preparing for case interviews more than 24 weeks in advance should not be necessary. 

 

Often times, candidates that start preparing too early will burn themselves out from having done too many practice cases. This often happens right before interviews begin, which leads to poor outcomes.

 

To avoid burning yourself out, start preparing for interviews ideally 16 to 24 weeks in advance and a minimum of 6 to 8 weeks in advance.

 

How do I prepare for case interviews?

 

There are seven steps to preparing for case interviews.

 

1. Understand what a case interview is

 

The first step in preparing for consulting case interviews is to understand exactly what case interviews are.

 

Case interviews are a special type of interview that every single consulting firm uses. They typically take 30 – 60 minutes and involve you working with the interviewer to solve a business problem and provide a recommendation.

 

When you are familiar with what case interviews are, it is important to know what a great case interview performance looks like.

 

Knowing what a great case interview performance looks like will facilitate how quickly you learn case interview strategies in the next step.

 

Before continuing onto the next step, you should be familiar with:

 

  • The overall objective of a case interview

 

  • The structure and flow of a case interview

 

  • The types of questions you could get asked

 

  • What a great case interview performance looks like

 

2. Learn the right strategies

 

Now that you have sufficient background knowledge, the next step in preparing for case interviews is to learn the right strategies to build good case interview habits.


It is much more effective to learn the right case strategies the first time than to learn poor strategies and try to correct them later.


The quickest, most efficient way to learn these strategies is to go through our Comprehensive Case Interview Course.


If you prefer reading case interview prep books instead, the three I recommend are:


 


 

Hacking the Case Interview provides strategies on exactly what to do and what to say in every step of the case interview. It is a concise and straight to the point guide. I recommend this book as the first book to read for beginners.

 

Case Interview Secrets teaches core concepts such as the issue tree, drill-down analysis, and a hypothesis driven approach. It illustrates these concepts through stories and anecdotes. If you have read Hacking the Case Interview, I recommend also reading this book to get perspectives from a second author. Check out our full review of Case Interview Secrets.

 

Case in Point provides a ton of specific and complex frameworks. However, you likely won’t be using many of these in an actual case interview because many of them are overly complex and specific. If you have time, it may be useful to skim through this book. Check out our full review of Case in Point.

 

At the bare minimum, read either the first or second book. If you have the time, read the first two books so that you can get strategies from two different authors.

 

Make sure to spend sufficient time learning the right strategies before starting to practice cases. It is ineffective to practice cases if you have no idea what strategies to practice and refine.

 

Before moving onto the next step, you should at least have strategies for the following parts of a case interview:


  • Developing unique and tailored frameworks

 

  • Solving quantitative problems

 

  • Answering qualitative questions

 

  • Delivering a recommendation

 

3. Practice 3-5 cases by yourself

 

Once you have learned the right strategies, the next step in case interview prep is to practice.

 

When practicing case interviews, it is usually better to practice with a case interview partner than to practice by yourself. Casing with a partner better simulates the real case interview experience.

 

However, when you are just starting to practice, I recommend doing the first 3 – 5 cases by yourself.

 

There are three reasons for this:

 

  • You can get the hang of the case interview structure and format much more quickly working by yourself rather than having to wait to schedule a time with a partner

 

  • There are many aspects of case interviews that you can practice without a partner, such as structuring a framework and solving quantitative problems. You can get much more practice working through these parts by yourself

 

  • You may have difficulty finding a case interview partner if you are a complete beginner. Without having done any cases, you likely won’t know how to properly give a case or provide good feedback

 

4. Practice 5-10 cases with a partner

 

The next step in preparing for case interviews is to case with a partner.

 

Casing with a partner is the best way to simulate a real case interview. There are many aspects of case interviews that you won’t be able to improve on unless you practice live with a partner.

 

When practicing cases with a partner, ensure you are spending enough time after cases to deliver feedback.

 

For a case that takes around 30 – 40 minutes, spend at least 15 – 20 minutes for feedback. Much of your learning and improvement will come from these feedback sessions.

 

Do not move onto the next step until you have done at least 5 – 10 cases and are beginning to feel comfortable with case interviews.

 

5. Practice with a former or current consultant

 

At this point, I highly recommend asking former or current consultants to give you a practice case. This will significantly help you prepare for case interviews.

 

Doing a mock case with a former or current consultant is highly advantageous because they know exactly how to run cases and give feedback. You’ll receive incredibly helpful feedback that your previous case partners likely missed.

 

If you feel that you are plateauing with your case partner, that is a sign you should do a mock case interview with a former or current consultant.

 

You can find former or current consultants among:

 

  • Friends

 

  • Classmates

 

  • Colleagues

 

  • People you met during the consulting recruiting process

 

  • Your broader LinkedIn network

 

I would not ask a consultant that is involved with the consulting recruiting process for a case too prematurely. Although these practice cases are not evaluative, some firms will actually make note of how well you perform during the practice case.

 

At this point, you will have accumulated a long list of improvement areas from all of the different people you have cased with.

 

6. Work on your improvement areas

 

In this step of preparing for case interviews, you will work on strengthening and fine-tuning your improvement areas. Examples of common improvement areas include:

 

  • Creating a more complete and mutually exclusive framework

 

  • Performing math calculations quicker or more smoothly

 

  • Providing more structure to your qualitative answers

 

  • Leading the case more proactively

 

  • Delivering a more succinct recommendation

 

Try to focus on improving one thing at a time. This is much more effective than trying to improve everything at once.

 

For some areas, such as math, it will be better to work independently. For other areas, such as learning to proactively lead the case, it will be better to work with a case partner.

 

If you are looking for more cases, look at the resources listed in step four. If you are looking for specific drills or practice problems for a particular part of a case interview, check out The Ultimate Case Interview Workbook.


Do not move onto the next step until you have finished working on all of your improvement areas.

 

7. Stay sharp

 

If you have progressed this far, congratulations! You have almost finished preparing for case interviews.

 

Once you feel that you have no more improvement areas to work on, the key is to not burn yourself out by doing too many unnecessary cases.

 

While each case that you do makes you slightly better, there is a point when doing too many cases can create case fatigue right before your interview. Case fatigue can negatively impact your interview performance.

 

On the other hand, you also don’t want to go weeks without having done a case. You may end up forgetting strategies or become rusty and slow.

 

Once you have achieved case mastery, I recommend doing no more than 2 cases per week in the weeks leading up to your interview. This ensures that you remain sharp for case interviews, but don’t have case fatigue.

 

What resources should I use to prepare for case interviews?

 

Here are our three resources that we recommend for case interview prep.

 

These resources teach the best case interview strategies that you only need to learn once. These strategies are robust, effective, and will help you stand out from the hundreds or thousands of other candidates competing for a consulting job offer.

 

  • Comprehensive Case Interview Course (our #1 recommendation): The only resource you need. Whether you have no business background, rusty math skills, or are short on time, this step-by-step course will transform you into a top 1% caser that lands multiple consulting offers.

 

  • Hacking the Case Interview Book (available on Amazon): Perfect for beginners that are short on time. Transform yourself from a stressed-out case interview newbie to a confident intermediate in under a week. Some readers finish this book in a day and can already tackle tough cases.

 

  • The Ultimate Case Interview Workbook (available on Amazon): Perfect for intermediates struggling with frameworks, case math, or generating business insights. No need to find a case partner – these drills, practice problems, and full-length cases can all be done by yourself.

 

If you’re looking for free resources, you can check out:

 

1. Learn case interviews in 30 minutes video (embedded below)


 

2. Other videos on the HackingTheCaseInterview YouTube channel

 

3. MBA casebooks with 700+ free practice cases

 

4. Free practice cases from consulting firm websites (see next section of article for links)

 

Case Interview Practice Cases for Beginners

 

The best practice cases for beginners are those that will most closely resemble the actual case interview you’ll get on interview day.

 

Below, we’ve consolidated official practice cases from all of the top consulting firms:

 

  • McKinsey Diconsa case interviewNon-profit case focused on deciding whether to leverage a chain of convenience stores to deliver basic financial services to inhabitants of rural Mexico. Great practice case for the non-profit sector.

 

  • McKinsey Electro-light case interviewNew product launch case focused on deciding whether a beverage company should launch a new sports drink. Outstanding case to practice interpreting various charts and graphs.

 

  • McKinsey GlobaPharm case interviewAcquisition case focused on deciding whether a large pharmaceutical company should acquire a smaller startup. This case has very difficult math calculations that you can practice.

 

  • McKinsey National Education case interview: Non-profit case focused on helping an Eastern European country’s Department of Education improve their school system. Another great practice case for the non-profit sector.

 

  • BCG airline case interviewProfitability case focused on helping a low-cost carrier airline improve profitability. This was an interactive case that was previously on BCG's website, but they took it down. We've linked our YouTube video that walks through it though, for you to follow along.

 

  • BCG drug case interviewPricing case focused on helping a pharmaceutical company determine the optimal price for a new drug. This was an interactive case that was previously on BCG's website, but they took it down. We've linked our YouTube video that walks through it though, for you to follow along.

 

  • Bain PrintCo case interview: Market entry case focused on helping a restaurant menu printing company decide whether to enter the electronic restaurant menu market. This case is in a video format and is helpful in understanding what an associate consultant-level interview looks like (post-undergraduate role).

 

  • Bain NextGen Tech case interview: Partnership case focused on helping a wearable computer device company determine which cellular network company to partner with in order to make $1B over the next two years. This case is in a video format and is helpful in understanding what a consultant-level interview looks like (post-MBA role).

 

  • Bain CoffeeCo case interviewMarket entry case focused on helping a friend decide whether she should open a coffee shop in Cambridge, England. This case is on the simpler, more basic side.

 

  • Bain FashionCo case interviewProfitability case focused on identifying how a fashion retailer can increase revenues. This case is on the simpler, more basic side.

 

  • Oliver Wyman Wumbleworld case interview practiceProfitability case focused on helping a theme park operator in China improve profitability. This case is fairly basic, but provides great practice for interpreting charts and graphs and practicing case math.

 

  • Oliver Wyman Aqualine case interview practiceRevenue case focused on helping a small powerboat manufacturer identify sales growth opportunities. This case is fairly basic, but provides great practice for interpreting charts and graphs and practicing case math.

 

 

  • LEK Market sizing example: This video provides an example of how to estimate the market size for medical consumables by general practitioners in the United Kingdom. The video is short and provides a great example on how to structure an approach to market sizing.

 

  • Roland Berger transit-oriented development case example: Profitability case focused on helping a local public transit operator improve its profits. This case is split into two videos, part one and part two.

 

  • Roland Berger 3D printed hip implant case example: Market entry case focused on helping the client assess whether additive manufacturing and the selling of hip implants is an attractive business. This case is split into two videos, part one and part two.

 

 

  • Deloitte Recreation Unlimited: Strategy case focused on driving 40% annual growth in direct-to-consumer digital channels over the next five years

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Deloitte Footloose case interview practice: Strategy case focused on helping a footwear company decide whether to focus on growing in the work boot sector of the market or the casual boot sector of the market. This case provides great practice for interpreting multiple different pieces of data simultaneously.

 

  • OC&C Hotel and Casino Co. case interview practiceBusiness strategy case focused on helping a hotel and casino operator decide what they should do with their health club business, whether they should divest it, grow it, or acquire another player in the market. This case helps illustrate the difference between good answers and excellent answers.

 

  • OC&C Whisky Co. case interview practiceProfitability case focused on helping a whiskey manufacturer and distributor determine how to increase profitability. This case helps illustrate the difference between good answers and excellent answers.

 

For even more practice, check out our article on 23 MBA consulting casebooks with 700+ free practice cases.

 

Common Case Interview Beginner Mistakes to Avoid

 


Case Interview Beginner Mistake #1: Lack of Structure

 

Failing to establish a clear framework for approaching the problem can lead to a scattered and unorganized response. It's important to outline a structured approach to solving the case.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #2: Making Assumptions Without Clarification

 

Assuming information without seeking clarification can lead to incorrect conclusions. It's crucial to ask thoughtful questions to gather all necessary details.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #3: Ignoring the Importance of Communication

 

Effective communication is key. Failing to articulate your thought process clearly or not actively engaging with the interviewer can hinder your performance.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #4: Overlooking the Objective

 

Some candidates get so engrossed in solving the problem that they lose sight of the ultimate goal - providing actionable recommendations. Make sure your analysis leads to a clear conclusion.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #5: Rushing Through the Case

 

Time management is crucial. Rushing through the case without taking the time to think critically about the problem can result in incomplete or inaccurate solutions.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #6: Neglecting Quantitative Analysis

 

Many cases involve numerical data. Failing to perform thorough quantitative analysis or making calculation errors can be a significant setback.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #7: Ignoring Alternative Perspectives

 

Tunnel vision can be detrimental. Failing to consider alternative viewpoints or approaches to the problem may lead to overlooking valuable insights.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #8: Focusing Too Much on Memorized Frameworks

 

While frameworks are useful, relying too heavily on memorized approaches can lead to a superficial understanding of the case. It's important to adapt your framework to the specific context.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #9: Neglecting to Check Assumptions

 

Sometimes, candidates make assumptions that are later proven to be incorrect. It's important to periodically revisit and validate your assumptions as you gather more information.

 

Case Interview Beginner Mistake #10: Lack of Practice and Preparation

 

Insufficient practice and preparation can lead to nervousness and poor performance during the actual interview. It's important to simulate case interview scenarios to build confidence and proficiency.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tips for Success

 


Case Interview Beginner Tip #1: Understand the Business Objective

 

The quickest way to fail a case interview is to answer or address the wrong business problem. Therefore, when the interviewer starts the case by reading the case background information, it is imperative that you identify what is the business problem and what is the primary question you are trying to answer. You should always verify the objective of the case with the interviewer.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #2: Ask Clarifying Questions 

 

Don’t be afraid to ask clarifying questions. You will not be penalized for this. If there is a term that you are unfamiliar with, ask for the definition. If you don’t understand the objective of the case, ask questions to clarify this. If there is important information that you were not able to write down, ask the interviewer to repeat specific pieces of information.

 

All of these questions will help strengthen your understanding of the case situation and make it easier for you to solve the case.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #3: Don’t Use Memorized Frameworks

 

The issue with using memorized frameworks is that they aren’t tailored to the specific case that you are solving for. Many times, some of the elements of your memorized framework will not be relevant or important to the case. Additionally, interviewers can easily tell when you are regurgitating memorized information and not thinking critically.

 

Instead of memorizing frameworks, memorize a list of 8 – 10 broad business areas, such as the following:

 

  • Market

 

  • Competition

 

  • Company

 

  • Customer

 

  • Profitability

 

  • Alternatives

 

  • Risks

 

When given a case, mentally run through this list and pick the 3 to 4 areas that are the most relevant to the case. If the list does not give you enough framework areas, brainstorm and add your own areas to your framework.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #4: Structure Your Math Approach 

 

Before doing any math calculations, lay out an upfront approach or structure to walk the interviewer through what you are about to do. Developing a structure will help you avoid making unnecessary calculations or reaching a dead-end. If the interviewer approves of your approach, then the rest of the math problem is simple arithmetic.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #5: Use Abbreviations for Large Numbers

 

If you are working with large numbers in the thousands, millions, billions, or trillions, use abbreviations rather than writing out all of the zeroes.

 

For example, 10,000 can be expressed as 10K, 200,000,000 can be expressed as 200M, and 300,000,000,000 can be expressed as 300B. This reduces the chances that you’ll accidentally add or drop a zero in your numbers.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #6: Talk Through Calculations Out Loud

 

Talking through your calculations out loud provides two benefits. One, it decreases the likelihood that you’ll make a mistake. Two, it makes it easier for the interviewer to follow what you are doing. If you happen to get stuck or make a mistake, the interviewer can jump in to offer suggestions or guidance. The interviewer cannot do this if you are not communicating exactly what you are doing.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #7: Sense Check Your Numbers

 

Accidentally missing zeroes or adding extra zeroes during your case interview calculations is the most common math mistake. To avoid this, you can do a quick sense check after each calculation to confirm that your answer is the right order of magnitude.

 

For example, if you are multiplying 115 million by 22, you should expect your answer to be in the billions because 100 million * 20 = 2 billion.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #8: Talk Through The Axes of Charts and Graphs

 

When given charts or graphs to interpret, the very first thing you should do is to look at the axes. This is the most effective way to understand what the chart or graph is showing. When you are given multiple charts or graphs, this will also help you understand how each chart or graph relates to each other.

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #9: Answer “So What?” After Every Question

 

When the interviewer asks you a quantitative or qualitative question during a case interview, don’t just answer it and stop there. After answering the question, ask yourself: “so what?” How does your answer help you solve the overall business problem? What implications does your answer have for your potential recommendation? You should be tying each answer that you give back to the case objective.  

 

Case Interview Beginner Tip #10: Have a Firm Recommendation

 

You do not want to have a flimsy recommendation in which you switch back and forth between two different recommendations. Instead, have a recommendation that takes a firm stance. Remember that there is no right or wrong recommendation. As long as your recommendation is supported with data and evidence, your recommendation will be accepted.

 

To see our complete list of 40 case interview tips, check out our comprehensive case interview tips article.

 

Beginner Case Interview Resources for Further Learning

 

If you’re looking to turn yourself from a case interview newbie to a pro that crushes case interviews in their sleep, here are the resources we recommend to learn the most robust, effective case interview strategies in the least time-consuming way:

 

  • Comprehensive Case Interview Course (our #1 recommendation): The only resource you need. Whether you have no business background, rusty math skills, or are short on time, this step-by-step course will transform you into a top 1% caser that lands multiple consulting offers.

 

  • Hacking the Case Interview Book (available on Amazon): Perfect for beginners that are short on time. Transform yourself from a stressed-out case interview newbie to a confident intermediate in under a week. Some readers finish this book in a day and can already tackle tough cases.

 

  • The Ultimate Case Interview Workbook (available on Amazon): Perfect for intermediates struggling with frameworks, case math, or generating business insights. No need to find a case partner – these drills, practice problems, and full-length cases can all be done by yourself.



  • Behavioral & Fit Interview Course: Be prepared for 98% of behavioral and fit questions in just a few hours. We'll teach you exactly how to draft answers that will impress your interviewer